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Life Extension Nootropics Reviews

Cerebramin and the Cytamins – My Experience

Even though the first nootropic, Piracetam, was discovered by a Romanian chemist, we can truly say that Russia is the true motherland of nootropics. From the “oldies”, such as Phenibut and Picamilon, to the newest additions, Russia has always been the bleeding edge of nootropic research. Today we are going to talk about Cerebramin and other compounds of the cytamins family.

Cytamins are nucleoproteins complex isolated from the organs of healthy cattle. These compounds are part of a new family of compounds developed in Russia, and called peptide bioregulators, that are being researched as anti-aging treatments.

Peptide bioregulators

From 1971 to 1996, researchers at the St Petersburg Bioregulation and Gerontology Institute studied and documented the role of peptides in aging. [1] [2] What they discovered is the body releases tissue-specific compounds, of peptide structure, that mediate interactions between cells. As such, they were named peptide bioregulators.

The researchers then isolated and purified those peptides from the organs of healthy cattle and pigs and found out that they had a normalizing effect on the abnormal cells of senescent and/or sick animals. These promising peptides have been developed into a new class of pharmaceuticals, the cytomedins, (e.g. Cortexin, Thymalin and Epithalamin, which has been further developed into Epitalon) as well as para-pharmaceuticals, the cytamins, such as Cerebramin, Vasalamin and Retinalamin.

Cytamins?!

So what’s the difference between the cytamins and the cytomedins?
Cytamins are “interpolymer complexes of tissue-specific proteins with nucleic acids.”[3] Essentially, they are a mixture of compounds such as nucleoproteins, vitamins, peptides and amino acids. The patented technology of cytamins manufacture includes alkaline hydrolysis from tissue cells, consecutive precipitation of nucleoprotein complexes, their purification from ballast substances, and manufacture of the ready form as enterosoluble tablets or capsules.[4]

In the manufacturing of Cytamins only calves and pigs less than 12 months old are employed, and strictly from Russian farms where “no human-endangering infectious diseases including transmissive bovine spongiform encephalopathy has been registered”.[5] Also, Russia is known for “its epizootological and epidemiological safety in respect to prion diseases.”[6] Not only that, but electrophoresis and Congo red staining (the recommended method of testing for Mad Cow disease) are employed to check for the presence of prion proteins.

There are over 17 cytamins on the market, and they are manufactured at “Longvy Farm” in Russia. More information about the cytamins can be found at the official website.

Some of the most famous cytamins are:

  • Brain (Cerebramin)
  • Liver (Hepatamin)
  • Stomach and duodenum (Ventramin)
  • Pancreas (Pancramin)
  • Lungs and respiratory system (Bronchalamin)
  • Heart (Coramin)
  • Circulatory system (Vasalamin)

Dr. A.S. Bashkireva[7] tested the use of Cerebramin and Vasalamin on driving performance, in both healthy subjects as well subjects with depression, anxiety and other mood disorders. The results were that the cytamins were “very effective in the correction of psychoemotional disorders and for attaining stable psychic adaptation”. [8]

[…] 150 professional drivers (men aged 30-59 years) were examined using a clinical questionnaire to identify, estimate and compare neurotic states according to 6 scales of anxiety, neurotic depression, asthenia, hysterical type of reacting, obsessive-phobic disorders and neurovegetative disturbances. The drivers were divided into 5 groups, 30 persons in each: I group received Cerebramin→, II — Vasalamin→, III — Cerebramin→ + Vasalamin→, IV — placebo, V — no preparations. […] The analysis of the incidence of various PES revealed a statistically significant increase in the number of drivers with stable psychic adaptation in Groups I, II, and III after cytamin correction as compared to the baseline level (3.3-, 2.4-, and 2.3-fold, correspondingly, p<0.001-0.05). A statistically relevant decrease in the number of the drivers with unstable psychic adaptation in Groups I, II, and III after a cytamin course was noted in comparison with the baseline level (2.5-, 3.0-, and 3.3-fold, respectively, p<0.001- 0.05). […] A detailed examination of the drivers’ PES according to different scales convincingly demonstrated the efficacy of combined application of Cerebramin and Vasalamin in correction of anxiety (p=0.001), neurotic depression (p=0.0001), asthenia (p=0.0001), hysterical type of reacting (p=0.0004), obsessive-phobic states (p=0.0001), and neurovegetative disorders (p=0.003). […]
The presented results showed the occupational hazards and long driving experience being the risk factors for the development of BMD. The applied parameters of PES and early manifestations of BMD are informative criteria for assessing the life quality and professional suitability of lorry-drivers. Cytamins […] are very effective in the correction of psychoemotional disorders and for attaining stable psychic adaptation. [9]

Cerebramin: My Experience

In my anecdotal, and totally unscientific experience with Cerebramin (the cattle brain extract), I can’t say to have noticed any effect. However, I am 24 years old, and this supplement is to be used in the elderly, so I cannot make any real judgment. That said, I feel that “real drugs” like the cytomedins (eg Epitalon, a pineal gland peptide, and Cortexin, a brain peptide) have a huge potential, and I’d like to try them out in the future.

You can buy Cerebramin, Cortexin and other rare Russian nootropics at RUPharma.

Cerebramin
5
Focus
6
Mood
5.5
Memory
5
Stimulation
5
Relaxation
7
Safety
Reviewer 5.5

References   [ + ]

Categories
Life Extension

Epitalon: The Fountain of Youth

For centuries mankind has searched for the “Fountain of Youth”; that proverbial source of everlasting life. Herodotus wrote of a spring that gave the water of youth to all who bathed in it. Juan Ponce de Leon looked for it in south Florida centuries later but didn’t find it. Man’s quest for such a fountain failed until Dr. Vladimir Khavinson discovered Epitalon in the 1980’s. The fountain turned out to be a peptide produced by the pineal gland [1].

Telomeres
Telomeres resemble the plastic tips on the ends of the shoelace that prevent it from fraying.

There are many theories of aging, one of which is the shortening of telomeres in our DNA. A telomere is like the plastic tip on the end of your shoe lace. It protects the DNA from unraveling during each cell division. Each cell division results in a slightly shorter telomere length, and eventually, the cell can no longer divide. This is called the Hayflick Limit, after Dr. Leonard Hayflick’s discovery that cells have a limited number of times that they can divide.[2] In mammals, the telomeres are protected from shortening until the onset of sexual maturity. After that, they begin to shorten with each cell division, eventually leading to an inability to divide any more in order to replace worn out, damaged or diseased cells. There is an enzyme called telomerase that is produced in the cells which stimulates the lengthening of the telomeres. The pineal gland produces a hormone called epithalamin that tells the cells to produce telomerase which in turn results in longer telomeres in our DNA. The functionality of the pineal gland declines with age, and is partly responsible for age related diseases. [3]

Dr. Vladimir Khavinson
Dr. Vladimir Khavinson
Khavinson V.” by Nikolay bilakOwn work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons.

What Dr. Khavinson found was that introducing epithalamin into mammals resulted in a reversal of age related diseases, and a reversal of the signs of aging. He was able to take geriatric female mice, who were no longer fertile, give them epithalamin, and after about two weeks of treatment, the mice became fertile again, got pregnant and had pups.[4] He showed that Epitalon induces telomerase activity in human somatic cells, proving that telomeres were lengthened by the peptide.[5] The synthetic version of epithalamin was patented by Dr. Khavinson and called “Epitalon” (also sometimes called epithalon since the original word is in Russian). It was approved for general use in the Soviet Union in 1990 and has been used in gerontology there ever since. No adverse side effects have ever been reported, according to Dr. Khavinson.

Since Epitalon is patented and trademarked, no drug company will research it. Since drug companies pay for almost all of the research on new medicines, no human clinical trials have been done in the West on it. Almost all of the research has been done by Dr. Khavinson and his associates. The results of his research are startling: for example, the application of Epithalamin diminished mortality in aged humans by 1.8 times over a 6 year period of observation. [6] Here in the West, Epitalon is sold as a research chemical, not approved by the FDA for any purpose, but unregulated for research purposes. Anyone who uses it is considered a “researcher,” in other words.

Epitalon chemical structure

Epitalon is a small peptide of 4 amino acids: Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly and can be administered via injection, as a nasal spray, or through the skin. The most effective route of administering it is via injection, either subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The peptide is typically given 2-3 times a day for 10-20 days in doses of 5-10 mg each. This cycle is repeated once every six to twelve months, but Epitalon can be given as often as desired. There are no negative side effects from the drug ever reported in over 100 studies on the peptide and from clinical use in Russia since 1990. Epitalon works mainly on the endocrine system but has effects on the entire body.[7]


 
When I first started taking it, my sense of smell returned, my digestion improved and I slept better. I have also noted positive changes in my vision and hearing. All of these functions are related to the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Epitalon has been shown to restore normal melatonin production in aging monkeys, as well as restore the normal circadian rhythm for cortisol production, both of which result in better sleep at night.[8]

Epitalon is certainly one of the most interesting anti-aging substance on the market, but further studies are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of telomerase activators.

Epitalon is not approved by the FDA and should not be used to treat or cure any disease.

For more in-depth information about Epitalon check out Epitalon, Part II: Mechanism of Action and the Epitalon’s Facebook group.

References   [ + ]